Thursday, 15 March 2018

Textile Body part five: The unknown








  It takes a while to get to the site of the operation but after passing through the labyrinth of the body we arrive at the cramped confines of the organs.Tucked away in the core they are mute and mysterious, their internal structures hidden from view underneath the smooth surface. Here is where the tiny stitches will be, the micro movements made with trained hands, the millimetre precision judged.


 It was with some interest that I found that different organs are tougher than others due to both age and structure so I chose three different types of fabric which would behave very differently. Not wanting to simply make bad anatomical soft toys I chose instead origami to represent the complexity of the body.I have loved the folded fortune teller since a child, the tactile experience of the folding sequence and then finding that you have made finger pockets and fold out layered areas to write messages on.


 In fabric they take on more mystery so I chose first paper silk which as its' name suggests behaves like paper and takes a fold very well.It is incredibly lightweight and yet resilient. Inspired by a conversation with a paediatrician I chose it to represent neonatal organs. I also chose a coarse weave linen and a slub silk.The latter was heavily frayed and after completing the folding  these were the ones that I chose to squash out of shape to show damage.
  Inside I have embroidered samples of stitches that I use in my raised embroidery and lacemaking work. The linen organs all have variations of buttonhole stitch whilst the silk organs have examples of picot stitch, french knots, cup stitch and, shown here, needlelace.


   Each of these stitches is relatively easy to work on their own and on flat fabric but when they are grouped together they present lots more difficulties.The needle is more likely to hit other stitches as you sew and your thread becomes spiralled and catches on the fabric.These are the same challenges as minimal access surgery both in the technicality of the stitch and of handling several materials at once.

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